Unjust Justice: Brock Turner’s Release

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Unjust Justice: Brock Turner’s Release

Washington Post

Washington Post

Washington Post

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The rapist Brock Turner, largely referred to as “former Stanford swimmer”, was found “thrusting” on top of his unconscious victim in early 2015 outside a nearby frat house.  Swedish exchange students Carl-Fredik Arndt and Peter Jonsson, were riding bikes by the scene that night when they spotted movement, and chased Turner into a nearby field with the help of two other students, Nicholas Sinclair and Beau Barnett, who tackled and restrained him until police could get him into custody. The survivor, known as Emily Doe, of the attack addressed Turner directly in court, asking the haunting question in a poignant letter: “I don’t sleep when I think about the way it could have gone if the two guys had never come. What would have happened to me?” Ultimately, Turner was released from Santa Clara County Jail on September 2nd, after serving half of a nauseatingly modest six month sentence.

Had the woman he left behind a dumpster become pregnant as a result of the assault, Brock Turner would have been out of prison before the child could say “privilege”. That is, if the fetus even survived while its mother endured spinal immobilization, two IV boluses, and IV therapy after being left unconscious and violated on the pavement. She recalls the saddening truth of the situation that one in five women in college endure, “You don’t know me, but you’ve been inside me, and that’s why we’re here today.” As this anonymous survivor displayed her fortitude, the stained glass eyes of strangers were captivated by her story. Vice President Joe Biden justifiably deemed her “a warrior — with a solid steel spine.”

Judge Aaron Persky, much like Turner, has faced backlash on the internet and even a petition calling for him to be impeached.

While the petition signed by 1.3 million people didn’t get him a spot in line at the unemployment department, he is no longer allowed to work on cases regarding sexual assault and that in itself is a step in the right direction.

Despite violating Penal Code 220A1, 289E, and 289D, and despite the malevolence in the stone that pumps black sludge through his veins, he was given a slap on the wrist, an inconvenient motel experience, and probation. Violation of Penal Code 289D alone calls for 3-8 years in prison. Even so, he blames the situation on alcohol and promiscuity. A subtle way of blaming the victim.

It is disturbing how easy it is for the judiciary to simplify a rape victim to a statistic, “Jane Doe”. It is disturbing how lenient Persky was while ruling. “He should be in prison right now, but he’s not in our custody,” Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith reported to CNN. “Judge Persky considered the ‘severe impact a state prison sentence would have on an offender Turner’s age.’” This statement was an efficient way of disregarding the appalling crime that Turner committed. It is evident that Persky would have said anything it took to secure Turner’s future as a successful, privileged white man. And although he is required to register as a sex offender, Judge Aaron Persky, and the entire judicial system for that matter, have failed miserably at bringing Jane Doe and women everywhere justice. They have succeeded, however, in further proving the suspicion of a racial and gender bias in the court system.